Nirvana - I Hate Myself And I Want To Die
979 plays

tayloroo:

One more quirky cliched phrase..
You’re the one I wanna refill

Matt Sharp and Damon Alburn

pooryorickentertainment:

Here’s an illustration of James O. Incandenza sent to me by Grant Gill. You can follow him on Instagram @great_gillianIt has been added to the Other Infinite Jest Fan Art page.

DFW,

pooryorickentertainment:

Here’s an illustration of James O. Incandenza sent to me by Grant Gill. You can follow him on Instagram @great_gillian

It has been added to the Other Infinite Jest Fan Art page.

DFW,

Weezer- Everything Will Be Alright In The End —-Review
Weezer is a band fronted by Rivers Cuomo.  Known for quirky, nerdy, bookwormish pop songwriting, Weezer has developed a dedicated following since their eponymous 1994 debut album, produced by Ric Ocasek of the 1980s super-successful new wave rock band, The Cars.
After 20 years of Weezer churning out album after album as Rivers Cuomo wrote songs like a robot programmed to hack into the mysteries of pop music, Weezer has returned to declare that rock and roll will live forever and it is because of this glorious fact that everything will be alright in the end.  Dreams fuel the fire that inspires soul, and as long as rock and roll persists, dreams never will die.
Weezer’s new album is released everywhere on October 7th, and after a few misguided commercial flops trying to appease record executives at Interscope and mindless summer records produced independently, Rivers Cuomo has taken the last four years since recording Hurley (2010) to let his muscles truly flex on Weezer’s new LP, Everything Will Be Alright In The End.
The album shines, especially during the second half.  This is a introversion from previous Weezer records, which generally start with 2 or 3 very strong tracks, and then simmer down into more tried-and-true rock tropes in the latter half.  EWBAITE more closely resembles Weezer’s second album, Pinkerton, in that it kicks off with lots of attitude and grooves, and then explores more experimental pop structures on the second half of the record.  
The album kicks off with some dreamy narration and chugging guitars in “Ain’t Got Nobody”, setting up the main presentational themes of the album.  Rivers Cuomo is drawn to ideas and concepts that begin with simple threads that soon unravel into complex nightmares (recall ”Undone - The Sweater Song” from 1994’s Weezer [The Blue Album]).  The opening track establishes the central lyrical themes of the album, focusing on the romantic desire for a lonely individual to find satisfaction through a significant other, using irony and rationalization to turn the tragic trope on its ever-living head.
Everything Will Be Alright In The End  continues chugging along with ”Back To The Shack” and “Eulogy For A Rock Band” which set up the desperation and desire associated with lonely romanticism and transform it into a literal meta-narrative (or metaphor) where Rivers Cuomo sings as a character that could be encapsulated in the narrative of an outcast named “Weezer”, the alternative rock band that found success early on in their career and then meandered with their path and purpose through the music landscapes of the early 21st century.  Many of Cuomo’s lyrics revolve around a lonely singularity hoping to achieve transcendence through a binding with a complementary other.  The logical and rational projection of reason presented in the lyrics is also reflected in the chord progressions and arrangements of the songs.
Songs such as “Lonely Girl” and “Go Away” set up traditional expectations for surf-rock/punk-pop songcraft, then veer off into genre-bending and key-changing solo sections in their later stages.  It becomes apparent throughout the various melodic constructions on the album that Cuomo is interested in finding spectacular inversions, counterpoints, and embellishments for traditional Beach Boys and 60s-style pop melodies. Lyricism can start to sound hollow for someone who pumps out verses as prolifically Rivers Cuomo was in the early 2000s, but in 2014 Cuomo sings with sincere joy and makes cultural references sound innocent among his crunchy trampoline-bouncy riffs.  “Cleopatra” is a song that demonstrates Cuomo’s best attempts at pop intellectual lyrics.  His most sentimental expressions have an earnest integrity when sung above the foundation of a tuneful vocal melody.  Some lyrics are so Cuomo-esque that they border on pastiche or postmodern parody.  Reminiscent of Weezer’s 2001 eponymous album (The Green Album), in “Lonely Girl”, Cuomo sings “So open your arms / And let me come in / I’d never hurt you girl / ‘Cause I that would be a sin / I’m lonely, so hold me / Can’t you relate?”  This character idea is really no different than Cuomo’s honest pleading with the romantic subject of Pinkerton’s “el Scorcho” in 1996: “I’m a lot like you, so please, hello, I’m here, and I’m waiting.”  But the sonic shapes that support the words are not quite as youthful as those early Weezer records.  With lots of bells and whistles, the album utilizes auto-tune and digital enhancements that don’t exactly mesh with the first two records where Rivers Cuomo refused to use any reverb or effects on his vocals.  Everything Will Be Alright In The End satisfies many pop-music patterns, but is missing the vital authenticity that seemed to ring in the feedback and raw recordings captured on Weezer’s albums in the 1990s.  The musicians playing the songs have only become more seasoned and deliberate with their instrumental performances, but the songwriting is as strong as its been in years. 
"The Futurescope Trilogy" that closes the album features few lyrics and mostly instrumental experimentations, that reinforce the mission statement of Weezer to always prioritize the shapes and feelings of melody over the pretensions and artifice of lyric.  The melodies of Weezer are demonstrated through pomp and circumstance, but they would sound just as natural played solo on a piano, which is how Cuomo reportedly crafted many of these songs.  Trained in classical music counterpoint and Southern Californian slacker ideology, Weezer has tightened their bootstraps on Everything Will Be Alright In The End  and proven they can produce records without glaring weak sections or filler.  The album is a Pixies-infused-with-Queen trip from start to finish, and leans heavily on the lead guitar solo for spectacle and movement.

Weezer- Everything Will Be Alright In The End —-Review

Weezer is a band fronted by Rivers Cuomo. Known for quirky, nerdy, bookwormish pop songwriting, Weezer has developed a dedicated following since their eponymous 1994 debut album, produced by Ric Ocasek of the 1980s super-successful new wave rock band, The Cars.

After 20 years of Weezer churning out album after album as Rivers Cuomo wrote songs like a robot programmed to hack into the mysteries of pop music, Weezer has returned to declare that rock and roll will live forever and it is because of this glorious fact that everything will be alright in the end. Dreams fuel the fire that inspires soul, and as long as rock and roll persists, dreams never will die.

Weezer’s new album is released everywhere on October 7th, and after a few misguided commercial flops trying to appease record executives at Interscope and mindless summer records produced independently, Rivers Cuomo has taken the last four years since recording Hurley (2010) to let his muscles truly flex on Weezer’s new LP, Everything Will Be Alright In The End.

The album shines, especially during the second half. This is a introversion from previous Weezer records, which generally start with 2 or 3 very strong tracks, and then simmer down into more tried-and-true rock tropes in the latter half. EWBAITE more closely resembles Weezer’s second album, Pinkerton, in that it kicks off with lots of attitude and grooves, and then explores more experimental pop structures on the second half of the record.

The album kicks off with some dreamy narration and chugging guitars in “Ain’t Got Nobody”, setting up the main presentational themes of the album. Rivers Cuomo is drawn to ideas and concepts that begin with simple threads that soon unravel into complex nightmares (recall ”Undone - The Sweater Song” from 1994’s Weezer [The Blue Album]). The opening track establishes the central lyrical themes of the album, focusing on the romantic desire for a lonely individual to find satisfaction through a significant other, using irony and rationalization to turn the tragic trope on its ever-living head.

Everything Will Be Alright In The End continues chugging along with Back To The Shack” and “Eulogy For A Rock Band” which set up the desperation and desire associated with lonely romanticism and transform it into a literal meta-narrative (or metaphor) where Rivers Cuomo sings as a character that could be encapsulated in the narrative of an outcast named “Weezer”, the alternative rock band that found success early on in their career and then meandered with their path and purpose through the music landscapes of the early 21st century. Many of Cuomo’s lyrics revolve around a lonely singularity hoping to achieve transcendence through a binding with a complementary other. The logical and rational projection of reason presented in the lyrics is also reflected in the chord progressions and arrangements of the songs.

Songs such as “Lonely Girl” and “Go Away” set up traditional expectations for surf-rock/punk-pop songcraft, then veer off into genre-bending and key-changing solo sections in their later stages. It becomes apparent throughout the various melodic constructions on the album that Cuomo is interested in finding spectacular inversions, counterpoints, and embellishments for traditional Beach Boys and 60s-style pop melodies. Lyricism can start to sound hollow for someone who pumps out verses as prolifically Rivers Cuomo was in the early 2000s, but in 2014 Cuomo sings with sincere joy and makes cultural references sound innocent among his crunchy trampoline-bouncy riffs. “Cleopatra” is a song that demonstrates Cuomo’s best attempts at pop intellectual lyrics. His most sentimental expressions have an earnest integrity when sung above the foundation of a tuneful vocal melody. Some lyrics are so Cuomo-esque that they border on pastiche or postmodern parody. Reminiscent of Weezer’s 2001 eponymous album (The Green Album), in “Lonely Girl”, Cuomo sings “So open your arms / And let me come in / I’d never hurt you girl / ‘Cause I that would be a sin / I’m lonely, so hold me / Can’t you relate?” This character idea is really no different than Cuomo’s honest pleading with the romantic subject of Pinkerton’s “el Scorcho” in 1996: “I’m a lot like you, so please, hello, I’m here, and I’m waiting.” But the sonic shapes that support the words are not quite as youthful as those early Weezer records. With lots of bells and whistles, the album utilizes auto-tune and digital enhancements that don’t exactly mesh with the first two records where Rivers Cuomo refused to use any reverb or effects on his vocals. Everything Will Be Alright In The End satisfies many pop-music patterns, but is missing the vital authenticity that seemed to ring in the feedback and raw recordings captured on Weezer’s albums in the 1990s. The musicians playing the songs have only become more seasoned and deliberate with their instrumental performances, but the songwriting is as strong as its been in years.

"The Futurescope Trilogy" that closes the album features few lyrics and mostly instrumental experimentations, that reinforce the mission statement of Weezer to always prioritize the shapes and feelings of melody over the pretensions and artifice of lyric. The melodies of Weezer are demonstrated through pomp and circumstance, but they would sound just as natural played solo on a piano, which is how Cuomo reportedly crafted many of these songs. Trained in classical music counterpoint and Southern Californian slacker ideology, Weezer has tightened their bootstraps on Everything Will Be Alright In The End and proven they can produce records without glaring weak sections or filler. The album is a Pixies-infused-with-Queen trip from start to finish, and leans heavily on the lead guitar solo for spectacle and movement.

nemfrog:

Fig. 13. Spiral nebula (more likely, a galaxy). Les Merveilles Céleste. 1881. 

nemfrog:

Fig. 13. Spiral nebula (more likely, a galaxy). Les Merveilles Céleste. 1881. 

cuttyspot:

joseph burgess, from new ‘lack thereof’ issue

finding-fucken-nemo:

astronomicaldream:

cloudyskiesandcatharsis:

Brilliant Thought-Provoking Satirical Illustrations by Pawel Kuczynski

Brilliant

It truly is

weezer:

Denver @riot_fest, 9/19/14. The monster, the Bokkus, and the @rivers_cuomo

weezer:

Denver @riot_fest, 9/19/14. The monster, the Bokkus, and the @rivers_cuomo

kdecember:

poem for Bob: lumberjack/duvet/incendiary

kdecember:

poem for Bob: lumberjack/duvet/incendiary

breathtakingdestinations:

Ober-Ottikon - Switzerland (von Tambako the Jaguar)

breathtakingdestinations:

Ober-Ottikon - Switzerland (von Tambako the Jaguar)

tryppi:

Dean Ellis

tryppi:

Dean Ellis